Category Archives: Linux

Chill Factor?

Today is a public holiday for Australia Day and it is another warm day in Sydney. But Fedora Linux says because of the slight breeze, there is a Chill Factor of minus three degrees, so 27 degrees feels like 30 degrees Celsius. We know that any breeze during the Winter makes it appear colder, but in the Summer it should do the same (evaporation from the skin and all that).

Chill Factor

Very strange. Please explain.

I think the effect may be due to the 90+ % humidity in the air. Any movement makes you feel hotter 🙂

Maybe the Fedora Weather Drop-down should include the humidity…

VirtualBox on Fedora 11

I have recently installed VirtualBox on Fedora 11 with the long-term goal of using my “old” scanner via Windows 98 as a virtual OS. The scanner appears to have no drivers for XP, so I had to revert to dual-booting from XP to Win98 in order to use the scanner — very tedious!

The first stage to test all this is setting up XP as a guest OS under VirtualBox. After activating itself (having found the internet immediately – clever, clever) it of course checks for updates. Here is a pic of the 59 it wanted:

VBox XP Updates

Then it’s a matter of sharing folders between the Host (Fedora) and Guest (XP). This turned out to be easier than I had thought. First, select a folder to share (Devices | Shared Folders | Add Shared Folder). Here I select the whole tree (from /home/bob anyway). Click Make Permanent, otherwise the entry is not remembered on next XP bootup.

VBox Add Share

Then, in XP, mount the shared folder as if it is on a LAN (right-click on My Computer and select Map Network Drive). Here I will mount the folder as drive H: under XP. Use Browse to find the full specs of the connection (impossible to guess if you don’t know that the computer name of the Host is \\vboxsvr):

VBox Map Drive

And finally, use good old ZTree to log the H drive and verify the files you expect to see:

VBox ZTree H:

VirtualBox really is an amazing piece of software.

Fedora 11 Updates

Fedora 11 usually downloads updates, but waits for the OK to install them. The little red icon in the message area indicates updates are available:

Fedora Updates 25

After installing them (and not needing a logout or re-boot), the little red icon reappears.

Strange. But after clicking it again, we get this:

Fedora Updates None Nothing to do? Wake Up! So, do we have to logout/login or re-boot or what? And is this the first Fedora 11 bug (that I’ve noticed)?

The OS (Windows 7) is Dead. Long Live the OS.

The Windows 7 Beta and RC1 versions have now expired. I did not want the Windows actions of 2-hourly shutdowns for a month before finally being unable to access my data.

Very nasty, Microsoft.

I have now dropped Windows 7 completely, as I’m sure others will too — refusing the extortionate $400 pricetag.

My OS of choice is now Fedora (a totally modern, free 64-bit Linux OS). It has pleasant surprises at every turn, like displaying the local weather when hovering over the time display —

Scattered Clouds

Automatic reboot – how Linux does it

A few minutes ago, my Fedora 11 box asked if it could install 11 updates (and it listed updates to Firefox and other browsers).  I said OK. Then the little red indicator appeared. Hover over it; take a screen-shot:

Fedora 11

Fedora 11 with restart message

It’s in the middle of more calculations at the moment, so I’ll wait 30 minutes or so until I can interrupt it. Then restart Fedora. Then resume the calculations.

That’s how a sane OS behaves.

Windows 7 prices announced by Microsoft

June 25 2009, Microsoft releases the U.S. retail prices for Windows 7.

For full retail versions:

  • Home Premium Full: $199
  • Professional Full: $299
  • Ultimate Full: $319

For retail upgrades:

  • Home Premium Upgrade: $119
  • Professional Upgrade: $199
  • Ultimate Upgrade: $219

At these prices, I don’t think I’ll be rushing out to buy.

When my RC1 version of Windows 7 Ultimate runs out next March 2010 I’ll be upgrading to the most stable Linux version I’ve ever used (Fedora 11).